Lestat: The Musical: The Review

Like "Wicked" from a few years ago, Broadway is trying out a new musical here in San Francisco to iron out the kinks before transplanting the show to the Great White Way. They’ve tried it a few times and have had successes (i.e. "Wicked") and failures (the John Lennon musical "Imagine," the Cuban mambo musical "The Mambo Kings" based on the 1992 film of the same name) and now Warner Bros. are putting their substantial bucks and bravado behind a musical adaptation of Anne Rice’s The Vampire Chronicles, specifically using material from the first two books of the series, Interview With The Vampire and The Vampire Lestat with music and lyrics by that bastion of 70’s drip-dry rock and 80’s treacle, Elton John and Bernie Taupin.
Frankly, when I first heard about the premise I was agog with anticipation, thinking this was either going to be an amazing marriage made in heaven (or, more accurately, hell) given the overt homoerotic nature of the material and Mr. John’s proclivity for penning incredibly tuneful and memorable songs, or horribly, incredibly bad — and not in the good “Showgirls” way, but in the regular old bad, bad way.
It winds up that Lestat, currently in previews, is somewhere in-between.


I am, or was, a big fan of Ms. Rice’s works, and in particular of the two volumes used to create this mess of a musical. They are sprawling works written in flowery, romaticized prose of the type that is not going to be everyone’s cup of tea, and they cover a whole lot of ground in their combined pages. One big problem that may not be able to be overcome in this stage version is that they attempt, over the course of its two acts and three-plus hours, to cover all of it. Not only are the characters left with trying to explain everything that’s happening and did happen and is about to happen involving sects of vampires of varying ages and degree of supernatural power, but there are also type-written introductions appearing on scrims between each scene to make sure the audience is keeping up.
For the record, that’s too much plot and not enough character. And therein lies the central problem with “Lestat;” we are never allowed the time to fall in like with anyone. The character of Lestat is not one that the majority of the audience can readily identify with anyway. His leading characteristics are arrogance and loneliness, and as embodied by Hugh Panero — whose cheekbones could slice one open as easily as his (non-existent) fangs — I was left wondering only when he would break into song again rather than wanting him to succeed at being… whatever it is he is trying so desperately to be. Mr. Panero has an amazing voice and he certainly looks the rogue, but the part as written is more childish whiner than powerful vampire, and he ends up coming off more annoying than interesting.
The songs are another major problem. When you leave a musical, you want to be humming a tune you just heard, if not belting out the chorus because you simply can’t help yourself, so carried away are you by theater’s ability to captivate and electrify like no other artistic medium. But there is no “Memory” here, no “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going,” no “I Am What I Am.” You can literally feel them trying to create a couple of hit songs in there, because they stick out and make their presence known. Largely, due to that plotting problem, the songs are also brought into play to bring the plot forward rather than establish something about the character singing them.
There are three exceptions, two of which appear for no other reason than to have a Hit Song suddenly appear. One is sung by child vampire Claudia (played full-throated and with the right balance of menace and innocence by Allison Fischer) who wanders center stage after a set change and starts singing about all the things she’ll never enjoy because she’s frozen in time as a little girl. But the song is aimless and stilted, and the chorus sucks.
Another song appears earlier in the production when Lestat’s mother, Gabrielle (a wonderful Carolee Carmelo, managing to convey the tired, out-of-place mother who sends her son into the world and the self-assured, masculine vampire with equal grace) also laments her own life, so there’s a lot of woe-is-me balladry happening.
The third set piece number that literally appears to be sandwiched into the musical as an afterthought has Lestat standing at the bow of a ship sailing back to Europe from New Orleans, having just been set up and burned alive — er, dead — by Louis and Claudia and singing about going home again. This number screams “Hit Single,” or at least an attempt at one, but it too falls flat mostly because you wonder why it’s occurring at all.
I suppose I should attempt to encapsulate some of the plot so those of you unfamiliar with the books — and I have to believe that if you haven’t read them, you don’t care about seeing this musical anyway (another built-in problem) — so you can see how much needs to happen on that single audio-visual stage set that doubles as one of the world’s biggest TV sets.
Unlike most current musicals since “The Phantom of the Opera” proved that a falling chandelier could be the most dynamic cast member on the stage, “Lestat” mostly eschews large physical special effects in favor of loud, weird short films superimposed over the entire stage. Generally, these illustrate that any time you drink someone’s blood, you also get to see their entire life flash before your eyes after taking a repetitive white-water rafting trip through their bloodstream. What your victim sees is left to your imagination, which probably works better. After the seventh or eighth trip through someone’s arterial highway, I was hoping just one victim had nothing interesting happen in their life worth showing.
But, the plot. Lestat is the son of a French nobleman in the 1800’s. Unappreciated by his father, his mother gives him some jewels and advises that he leave their country estate and go into the world to discover who he is. Taking along his best friend Nicolas, the two go to Paris and join the theatre, Lestat as the handsome leading man and Nicolas as an expert violinist. I’m sure we can all relate to that. Soon, Lestat is seized by an old vampire, Magnus and given “the dark gift” before his maker throws himself into a fire, explaining nothing at all of what being a vampire means.
The common theme of lonliness and abandonment comes in early as Lestat turns both Nicolas and his mother into vampires, hoping they will stay with him. Nicolas goes batty, and Gabrielle gets bored of her son’s continual lamentations about the meaning of it all. Enter Armand, a smarmy and unlovable vampire who runs the Paris coven from teh catacombs, teaching the other vampires that they are borne of Satan and must stay underground and be afraid all the time, a theory which Lestat and Gabrielle easily disproove (in a musical number, obviously) making Lestat his first real enemy. However, Armand tells Lestat about his own maker, Marius, an ancient vampire with many secrets to empart about this life.
Nicolas finally offs himself and Gabrielle wants to go exploring the world, so Lestat goes underground, literally, as the stage rises around him in a rather awkward depiction of self burial. Suddenly, the skies open up and out pops a rather large black man in red robes, and just when you think it’s Geoffrey Holder making his comeback, we learn it’s actually Marius and he lifts Lestat from his weird relief-map burial and the orchestra suddenly bursts into a loud harrangue to wake the audience up so they can go out and grab a smoke between acts.
Act two opens on a hopeful note, as Marius tells Lestat to go to America because Europe is such a downer. At last, we think, we’re going to get to the happy part of the musical. Alas, it is not to be.
Two scene changes later, we are in the New Orleans estate of Lestat and his current partner-lover-depression, Louis. For about half of act two, Lestat starts acting like the Lestat from “Interview.” The first half of the play was all earnestness, and suddenly we’re treated to a prick who’s at least fun and entertaining, but there’s a disconnect between the two characterizations that never clicks. Why is he suddenly acting like this?
As mentioned, Lestat tries again to keep everyone happy by killing people and then gets burned up. Chasing Louis and Claudia back to Paris, he again encounters Armand who has taken over the Theatre of the Vampires where Louis and Claudia have landed. Finding that Claudia tried to kill her maker, they expose her to the sun and she goes up like a Roman Candle. We are only slightly annoyed by this because she was the most interesting character on stage, and now we’re left with nothing but all these self-righteous cry babies who can fly and are both immortal and impervious to pretty much everything but ennui.
And remember, I’m a fan.
Anyway, in the books, the ending is a cliffhanger as Lestat again goes underground only to be woken by a loud rock group practicing in his abandoned New Orleans house. He emerges, takes over lead vocals and comes out to the world as a vampire, making all the other vampires pissed off until the queen of all vampires appears and sets up the third book — but they can’t end a musical with a cliffhanger, can they? That’s not really an ending, so how are they going to resolve that?
In short, the don’t. The ending is horrible. I think I was supposed to take a lesson from the previous three hours and leave the theatre appreciating my life and all the people I’ve killed in order to make them stay with me, sort of like John Wayne Gacy, because what happens in the play is that Lestat gets another visit from The Wiz, ascends a staircase, drinks from the arm of the vampire queen and then all the other main characters appear to sing us to the curtain call with a song about, as far as I could tell, what a great time is to be had when one embraces death. Or something like that. Really, it was hard for me to tell what was going on because I was laughing to hard to see through my tears.
“Lestat” doesn’t work as musical theatre. It could, but in its present form it suffers from the same problem as the first two Harry Potter films. It tries too hard to be faithful to the source material. It treats Anne Rice’s words and characters with a reverence usually reserved for Biblical epics. The few sparks of (intentional) humor were so sparce that when you were allowed to feel something other than a headache, it was like pouring cool water down a parched throat. There’s an absurdity to the situation that should occur even to the characters on stage dealing with what’s happening around them that’s never dealt with, and the audience is being bombarded with so much plot in the form of dialogue, songs, short films and voice-overs that it’s all a little like sitting through a third grade filmstrip presentation about vampiric history.
Then there are the songs, which are almost uniformly forgetful, and a few are simply dreadful. The sole exception in my view is when Claudia, the child vampire, sings of wanting more. It manages to finally inject some life in what is otherwise a succession of turgid requiems coming from the pens of one of the most successful and talented pop song teams in history. Elton, what the hell is wrong? Did marriage strip you of your sense of humor?
I hope they can pull this together before heading east, because there’s potential within the source material, but it needs to become a lot more like “Little Shop of Horrors” than Les Miz.

January 8, 2006

9 responses to Lestat: The Musical: The Review

  1. jason ashken said:

    The word on Lestat is that despite bad reviews in San Francisco the show�s scenery, projections and lighting are said to be a feast for the eyes and, the staging when existent a driving force. The cast is excellent and the creative staff is plugging away at cuts and fixes. It�s been mentioned that the show is getting some necessary rewrites to pare back extraneous exposition conveyed within the dialogue and lyrics.
    It is also heavily rumored that another problem with the production is the costumes. Un-proportionate, unflattering, and nonfunctional were a few of the adjectives used to describe them. Evidently the costume designer, Susan Hilferty (of Wicked fame) has created costumes for the ensemble much like Maria Von Trapp did for the children in the Sound Of Music. For a predominantly period musical, little attention has been paid to any tailoring or fit and the cast is said to have problems performing even the simplest of blocking. Ms. Hilferty, it is rumored, has a well-known �attitude� towards not accommodating body types and\or facilitating physicality with her costuming. She�s known for sandbagging serious choreographers and their choreography in the past.

  2. Leon Glover said:

    My wife and I just saw the first half of Lestat –and decided to leave at intermission so as not to disrupt the “musical” with our laughter. In 20 years of viewing movies and theater, this is only the second time I’ve ever walked out out of a product midway through it.
    Unfortunately, we did not check reviews prior to buying tickets. Given the material (Anne Rice) and the musician (Elton John), we presumed it would be at least enjoyable or interesting….neither of which can be said to be true. The “musical” failed in every possible way. The dialog was slow, poorly written and stilted, the excrutiating equivalent of being forced to listen to a dramatic reading of Hallmark cards. When we gave up on the dialog (in the first 5 minutes), we shifted our attention to the music, both hoping for a strong musical score consistent with Elton John’s work in Lion King, where the songs matched the context and feel of the story. What we least expected and were shocked to hear (resulting in the only dramatic moment we experienced throughout) was virtually a repeat of the Lion King’s music, filled with a strange jumble of lyrics, and, while appropriate for an audience of children, hardly appropriate to be sung by the undead!
    The stage “production” consisted of a heavy reliance on projected images and rudimentary lighting techniques, which one would only find entertaining if on hallucinogens, and even then, would likely find them more laughable than scary. Perhaps this was indicative of a low budget, which would also explain why some of the costumes appeared to be made from Motel 6 bedspreads and window dressings.
    To their credit, the actors tried to make something of this, yet they too appeared bored with the script and the songs, and clearly knew the material was very weak. Even with their talent, only a miracle can turn a sow’s ear into a silk purse.
    In sum, I am appauled that the production company is charging the amount of the money they are for the tickets. This is irresponsible and bordering on fraud. If anything, this is an effort by Warner Brothers production to get people to stay away from the live theater and back into movie theaters.
    This will never make it to Broadway, nor should it. Save your money – and don’t give life to what should be dead. Though Lestat may bemoan his interminable existence, we can put his musical out of its misery.

  3. rik said:


    �� Theatre of the Absurd Ticket Price, January 10, 2006
    Reviewer: jeffjeff
    For $100 a ticket, the only way audience members can get their moneys’ worth at Lestat, other than speculating what might and might not be right and wrong with the “potential” in the show, would be to bring a large bag of rotten vegetables and throw them at the actors as they appear on stage, one at a time for three hours.
    It’s an absurdity of theatre in modern times that so very much money can be thrown at so rich a gaggle of fat, talented geese and so shallow and false a result can be produced.
    This show may remind people that a few good actors on an empty stage, with a good story and dialog, can weave a greater spell than all the money and special effects in the world.
    4 of 4 found this review helpful
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    �� Underwhelmed and disappointed, January 4, 2006
    Reviewer: cilla4991
    Attended Jan 3 performance in SF and was very disappointed, particularly with the score. There were only 2-3 notable songs and the remaining numbers were words sung to dull music. No sustaining, key melody. First act dragged as a tiresome series of relationship reflections. Second act improved when the show focused on deeper dimensions of fewer characters. Set design was well-done, but does not measure up to Elton John’s Disney-funded musicals. Excessive use of multi-media that undermined the artistic creativity of live stage performances. On a positive note, the cast and vocal talent were strong for all key roles.
    4 of 5 found this review helpful
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    �� A complete waste of time, January 4, 2006
    Reviewer: molex3
    The reviews here that rave about this… thing… can only be the result of delirious fandom gone horribly awry. This play stinks, it’s awful, it’s unwatchable. My wife and I, who have both read and enjoyed the books by Anne Rice that this steaming pile of theatrical dung is based on, left at the intermission, the play is AWFUL.
    The “drama” is so poorly crafted that it borders on comical. The half-hearted turns given by the cast are clearly phoned-in, and contain nothing even bordering on heat, passion or believability. The mawkish sets and poorly integrated film-style clips only serve to highlight the utter paucity of entertainment to be had. The musical score is painfully at odds with the material at hand, and the scripting is simply terrible.
    This play is a bomb. I heartily regret spending (wasting, actually) the money to see this flop.
    One review here got it 100% right already: To say this is the worst musical ever is indeed an insult to the word “worst”.
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    �� Absolute Garbage, January 1, 2006
    Reviewer: rikfriday
    I just saw Lestat in San Francisco. The show is one boring, endless, repetitive non-interesting, uninvolving, useless piece of theatrical garbage.
    The production is without any musical or dramatic value whatsover. The music is endless, monotonous and dull. The story is a boring, drawn out, humorless, incomprehensible echo of the film ‘interview with a vampire’.
    I like Elton John, and I would say there are, at most, 2 minutes of good music in this show, which lasts about 3 hours. The music sounds exactly the same (boring opera-like drab, tedious songs) from start to finish, save about 7 bars toward the end, where a minor amount of actual Elton John-ish harmonic color rises unexpectedly in one very short choral finale.
    To say that this is the worst musical ever written, is an insult to the word ‘worst’…
    The audience was mostly stunned into silence during the performance, and the curtain call was short and swift. I find it hard to believe this show will play on Broadway.
    It would be a better show if they played all the audio-visual background projections for three hours and left all the actors off the stage entirely.
    6 of 9 found this review helpful
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    �� Don’t waste your time and money, January 6, 2006
    Reviewer: jferrare2
    Lestat is, unfortunately, one of the worst Broadway-quality musicals I’ve ever seen. Some good performances, though the child who plays Claudia appears to have been plucked from the cast of “Annie.” One spectatcular song in the second act. I almost left at intermission, and except for this one song, would not have missed anything new. I don’t know what they can do in 2 months to make this ready for New York. Good luck!
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    �� Pointless Trash, January 3, 2006
    Reviewer: sslayton01
    I recently saw Lestat in San Francisco. I have not read the Vampire series, and this fact, combined with the horrible music, made the play almost unbearable. The plot was fragmented, and the dialog was uninteresting. All said, I wasted $300 for 2 tickets.
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    � Lestat in previews, January 8, 2006
    Reviewer: zan1013
    Saw it the 28th of December in SF. Awful, disappointing, excruciatingly LOOONNNG. Fled the theatre in disgust at intermission.
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    �� Uhhhg!!!!, January 8, 2006
    Reviewer: dcmendell
    I saw a preview performance of Lestat in San Francisco and I think it is way beyond fixing. The songs were very unmemorable. Many of the special effects had me laughing in my seat. At first I thought the acting was horrible, but when I realized that it was consistantly horrible across the board (much of the time by actors I have admired in previous shows) I realized it was the direction that was so bad. The choreography was also poor. Save your money and time and avoid this show!
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    �� Lestat est la morte, January 9, 2006
    Reviewer: jjhagan
    Attended Lestat last evening in San Francisco at the Curran theater (1-7-06). The Curran is a large expansive theatre which hosted Phantom of the Opera for years. Unfortunately, the staging for Lestat was clumsy, bleak, dreary and low-budget. The first act dragged, but the second act was torture. There was nothing “spellbinding” or “captivating” about it. On the contrary, it was uninspired and charmless. I could not connect with any of the characters and by intermission I didn’t care what happened to them. The music sounds like an Elton John and Bernie Taupin effort – but without any joie de’vivre or signature sassiness. Indeed, many songs were distracting in their overwordiness. Unlike the play Wicked, there isn’t a single memorable song. Hugh Panaro as Lestat is vital, with a beautiful speaking and singing voice, but not very compelling. Allison Fischer as the 10 year old Claudia has the chops to sing with the best, but is more spunky than dark. She does, however, have the best lines of the play. I went with high expectations given the artistic pedigree of this production. The depth of my disappointment may be obvious. On this point, I disagree with Louis in his incessant whining, the true evil is not cowardice, but squandered potential. Alors! Lestat est DOA.
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    �� Lestat is Driving Tonight on a Plane, January 14, 2006
    Reviewer: moutcalt
    Lestat is so tepid, it seems inappropriate to use superlatives in sharing the horror. Suffice it to say: yuck.
    The writing wobbles sluggishly through rapid fire plot points shot at poorly drawn characters singing wholly unmemorable songs better suited to a Disneyland parade.
    The cinematic elements go from poorly executed and inconsistent (during the moments when the vampire feeds) to entirely unnecessary (the pointless passages from the book appearing as words on the screen). Unneccessary elements in a show that’s too long to begin with play like mockery to numbed limbs and aching backsides.
    Although there is some true vocal talent in the cast, the hollow plot and ridiculous songs squelch the hope of any notable performances.
    While there is no doubting the John/Taupin team as master song craftsmen, the music was unremakable and the songs completely at odds with the story. Anne Rice’s dark, sensual novel just doesn’t translate through major chords, piano ballads and (gasp) tamborines.
    You may read all the bad reviews and think you’ll give Lestat a shot despite what everyone says. Don’t. Those are three hours you can never get back.
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    �� Uhhhg!!!!, January 8, 2006
    Reviewer: dcmendell
    I saw a preview performance of Lestat in San Francisco and I think it is way beyond fixing. The songs were very unmemorable. Many of the special effects had me laughing in my seat. At first I thought the acting was horrible, but when I realized that it was consistantly horrible across the board (much of the time by actors I have admired in previous shows) I realized it was the direction that was so bad. The choreography was also poor. Save your money and time and avoid this show!
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    �� Lestat: Train Wreck or Musical?, January 8, 2006
    Reviewer: pixar2000
    This is, without a doubt, the worst musical I have ever seen. I could not make sense of the first half at all, and I am a huge Anne Rice fan and know those books well. It seemed as though they took bits and pieces from all the books and then threw them together, mixing and matching, without any regard for dramatic cohesion.
    The video montage that accompanied every vampire bite was laughable and ridiculous (I actually heard the woman behind me say, “Oh great, here we go again,” at one point). The songs and lyrics were soooo disappointing, I cannot believe that Elton John and Bernie Taupin worked together on this. It wasn’t even close to what I’ve come to expect from those two, it was just plain sloppy, second- or even third-rate material.
    The performers were good, but what they had to work with was truly awful. The only bright light was the young woman playing Claudia, who had a few fun scenes, but honestly seemed a lot more like Verucka Salt than Claudia the vampire.
    I cannot believe this will ever make it on Broadway in it’s current condition. The first half is an absolute disgrace, the second half only slightly better. Do not waste your money.
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    �� I was there too on Jan 8th for Lestat, January 10, 2006
    Reviewer: willwjl5
    The audience were being polite to the performers, who were accomplished and talented, not enthusiastic about the show or the music. In all seriousness to all the folks there on the 8th, was there truly ONE memorable song in the show? “I want more” is the only refrain I can recall from nearly 3 hours of music. That was a small part!
    I would expect that a halfway decent musical would have a number of songs I would want to hear again. Or at least have me humming along to the melody afterward. Not one in the bunch. I’m familiar with the book’s characters, so I understood the story line. But would anyone who didn’t know anything about the Anne Rice books be able to follow along? I think not.
    The special effects were cheap and hokey.
    I received free tickets to attend this performance. I’m thankful I didn’t pay a cent for this. I am truly disappointed. I had high hopes for the project. It lacked the sensuality, humor and horror of the books.
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    �� Painful to sit though, January 8, 2006
    Reviewer: rtumber
    Through the first half of Lestat, my friend and I could not believe how very very bad the narrative and the songs of the play were (we were very disappointed). The second half was so bad that it became almost funny. Almost. DO NOT PAY MONEY TO SEE THIS PLAY. Seriously, if you must, just watch Interview with a Vampire a few dozen times to get it out of your system.
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    �� Avoid Lestat like the plague!, January 15, 2006
    Reviewer: nodens1
    My wife and I just saw the first half of Lestat – and decided to leave at intermission so as not to disrupt the “musical” with our laughter.
    We hoped for an enjoyable or interesting play, neither of which can be said to be true. The “musical” failed in every possible way. The dialog was slow, poorly written and stilted (excrutiating equal to listening to a dramatic reading of Hallmark cards). We hoped for a strong musical score consistent with Elton John’s work in Lion King, where the songs matched the context and feel of the story. What we least expected to hear was virtually a repeat of the Lion King’s music, filled with a strange jumble of lyrics, and, while appropriate for children, hardly appropriate to be sung by the undead!
    The stage “production” consisted of a heavy reliance on projected images and rudimentary lighting techniques. Perhaps this was indicative of a low budget, which would explain why some of the costumes appeared to be made from Motel 6 bedspreads.
    The actors tried to make something of this, yet they too appeared bored with the script and the songs. Even with their talent, only a miracle can turn a sow’s ear into a silk purse.
    I am appauled that the production company is charging $90/seat for the tickets. This is irresponsible and bordering on fraud. If anything, this is an effort by Warner Brothers production to get people to stay away from the live theater and back into movie theaters.
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  4. barbie2be said:

    I received tickets for this show for Xmas. Saw it on Saturday (1/14/06). Both my friend and I thought it was amazing. The costumes are gorgeous the story is true to the book, and the main actors all sounded incredible. Especially Claudia played by (Allison Fisher?) She belted out the song More with real feeling.
    If you have tickets to one of the upcoming performances and don’t want to go after reading these reviews, give them to me. I will be thrilled to enjoy the show again on your behalf.

  5. harrypotter said:

    I’m a really nice person, and very easy to please when it comes to musicals and theatre in general.
    I saw this show twice, and I have to say, the people who think this show was a good show, must be entirely stupid to the Nth degree.
    I would rather watch Andy Warhol’s 10 hour film of the Empire State building than see this show again.

  6. Philip said:

    Although I appreciate you humor, outlook and sarcasim, I think that any review of “Lestat” that doesn’t contain a term such as “ABORTION” or “DRECK” or “FLEECING” is a disservice.
    Overblown and distracting “multi-media” set and artistic design, a convoluted and disjointed “plot” and characters that one wouldn’t tinkle on if they were on fire are only the high points. The most sympathetic character, Claudia the doll-like vampire, is converted on stage to a snotty brat – a character stolen either from “The Bad Seed” or “Mildred Pierce”. Her out of place is-this -supposed -to be- funny song “I Want More” would only be slightly clever if it wasn’t so wrong for the tone of the show and an unfortunate abuse of the tragic nature of the character (as intended, not as played.)
    As for the music and lyrics…to describe them as forgettable is not accurate… as one must have first processed or cared in order to forget something.
    I want my money back. One last point…I am a major fan of Anne Rice, but her biography in “Playbill” ( provided by her agent, I am told) and her endorsement of this fiasco on her web site are insulting and a disgrace. If I were her, I would distance myself from this mess ASAP. Bye Lestat, Bye Anne…see ya in hell.

  7. Aileen said:

    My 16-year old daughter and I just saw Lestat on Broadway April 13. I had bought tickets thinking the music would be enjoyable and the theme would be a different kind of theatrical experience for my daughter. While we didn’t hate it, we didn’t love it either. None of the songs are memorable and the story comes across as kind of boring. You don’t really care what happens to the characters. I left the theatre thinking that it would be hard to recommend it to friends and doubting that it would have a long run. The whole story is kind of depressing and you don’t leave feeling happy and uplifted as you do after most musicals which is what I think the mass audience/tourists are looking for.

  8. gregory from brooklyn said:

    I just saw the show today, April 19 and it was one of the most boring, underdeveloped, and lack luster shows I’ve ever seen. The acting, fine, we won’t touch it. The story, the plot, where is it?Throwing three books into two and a half gruling hours of ballad after ballad with one single memorable line…you just can’t do it and have it be a success. The score is not what I would have expected from Elton John. The whole thing…a sham. A shame too.

  9. Frederic said:

    I want my money back. Vampires should not come out at night and think they can face the broadway lights. The show is a total failure. You will want to jump on stage and yell out — enough already, everyone shut up!